Small Prints, Big Impact: Carnegie Museum Pays Tribute to Printmaking

An exhibition in Pittsburgh is celebrating artists that revolutionized printmaking. Small Prints, Big Artists: Masterpieces From the Renaissance to Baroque at the Carnegie Museum of Art chronicles the development of printmaking as a legitimate art form.

The Martyrdom of Saint Lucy; etching and engraving; Patrons Art Fund in honor of Linda Batis.

The Martyrdom of Saint Lucy by Jacques Bellange, etching and engraving. Collection Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

In its earliest forms, printmaking was used for religious purposes, with sheets often given to pilgrims at monasteries and shrines. By 1500, printmaking techniques such as woodcut and etching gained the attention of many fine artists. Included in the exhibition are more than 200 works, many of them by some of the best-known artists of the Renaissance era and beyond, including Rembrandt, Canaletto, Tiepolo and Piranesi.

You can visit the Carnegie Museum of Art’s website to view more paintings from the exhibitions. Subscribe to Drawing magazine for more information on upcoming exhibitions.

Saint Catherine in the Clouds by Peter Paul Rubens, early 1620s, etching and engraving. Collection Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

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