Spanish Drawings on Display at The Morgan Library & Museum

The Morgan Library & Museum in New York City is presenting its first exhibition that showcases Spanish drawings.

Although drawing was long thought to have been relatively uncommon among the Spanish masters, recent research suggests that drawing was central to artistic methods in Spain from the 16th to the 19th centuries. “Visions and Nightmares: Four Centuries of Spanish Drawings” explores the role of drawing in Spanish art through works from The Morgan’s preeminent master drawings collection. The exhibition features well-known artists such as José de Ribera and Francisco Goya but also introduces drawings by talented but less familiar artists such as Vicente Carducho and Eugenio Lucas.

The exhibition of more than 20 sheets runs through May 11. If you aren’t able to visit the exhibition in person, you can see all the works on display through The Morgan’s website. And to learn about more great exhibitions, don’t forget to subscribe to Drawing magazine!

Marsyas Bound to a Tree by José de Ribera, ca. 1630s, red ink. Collection The Morgan Library & Museum, New York City.

Marsyas Bound to a Tree
by José de Ribera, ca. 1630s, red ink. Collection The Morgan Library & Museum, New York City.

 

Pesadilla (Nightmare) by Fransisco Goya, black ink and wash. Collection The Morgan Library & Museum, New York City.

Pesadilla (Nightmare)
by Fransisco Goya, ca. 1816-1820, black ink and wash. Collection The Morgan Library & Museum, New York City.