Landscape Approach by Jeremy Lipking

My process for painting landscapes is much the same as it is for painting the human form. Spring Waterfall is based on a scene I’ve painted many times, yet I find that this place never grows old or fails to entice.

Spring Waterfall, oil, by Jeremy Lipking

I started with a 8×10 study painted en plein air. While painting, I carefully analyzed the light on the rocks and the movement of the water, recording what I saw for later use in the studio.

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landscape painting demonstration

In the studio I did a series of sketches with vine charcoal on plain paper. These are very simple abstract drawings that I used to work out the big shapes and the movement within the painting. I ultimately chose the top right composition.

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landscape painting demonstration

I toned the canvas with burnt sienna and ultramarine blue, and blocked out the light-and-dark pattern.

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landscape painting demonstration

At this point I began painting at the top of the waterfall, finishing each section before I moved to the next. Because I’d planned the whole painting with the color study and sketches, I could see the finished work clearly in my head. All I needed to do was put what I’d envisioned onto canvas.

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landscape painting demonstration

I deviated a little from my vision by slightly adjusting the shapes and sizes of the rocks. Small sketches don’t always translate perfectly when you blow them up, although I remained fairly close to my sketch and the initial block-in. Studies and sketches help, but my most important tool is my memory.

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landscape painting demonstration

With the addition of some thick paint in the foreground whitewater, I completed Spring Waterfall (oil, 30×40).


An artistic atmosphere surrounded Jeremy Lipking from his earliest days, as his father worked in a home studio as a professional illustrator. Jeremy himself broke into the contemporary art scene in 1996, when he sold his first paintings (watercolor landscapes) at $500 each. These sales provided an unexpected windfall for the 24-year-old who was juggling art studies, work and family responsibilities. Winner of numerous awards, Lipking felt success hit home in a different way last year at the Los Angeles Art Show when Barbra Streisand confided to him that she was familiar with his work and counted herself an admirer. For more information, visit Lipking’s website at www.lipking.com.

 

To learn more about Lipking’s process in the feature article “Drawing Out the Riches,” by Louise B. Hafesh, click here and order the November 2008 issue of The Artist’s Magazine.


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