Now Available: Deborah Secor ArtistsNetwork.tv Workshops

We’re extremely pleased to announce two new workshop videos just launched on ArtistsNetwork.tv, a new site from F+W Media that offers instructional (streaming) videos from today’s leading artists. These new workshops feature none other than Deborah Secor, popular artist, instructor and regular contributor to The Pastel Journal. In the first workshop, she explains everything you need to know to get started in pastels and shows you her favorite tools. In the second, Secor teaches you to paint realistic shadows.
Click below to see a preview of the videos.

You can also watch previews of the other seven 40-plus minute videos to help you decide if you’d like to subscribe to an individual workshop ($14.99) for a six-month period with unlimited, 24/7 viewing access, or subscribe to all of them for a six-month period ($69.99) with unlimited, 24/7 viewing access. You don’t have to download anything, and you can watch any time of the day as long as you have a high-speed Internet connection.

If you haven’t already, sign up to receive our e-mail newsletter for advance notice on new workshops. (Go to our homepage and enter your e-mail address in the left-hand corner.)

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2 thoughts on “Now Available: Deborah Secor ArtistsNetwork.tv Workshops

  1. Deborah Secor

    Jessica, thank you so much! I really want to say a BIG thank you to all the people who contributed to the making of these videos. It was delightful to travel to Cincinnati and meet all of you, and the experience of making the videos was quite a treat, too. I never realized how much went into such a thing. The video crew was so helpful, and it was great to have the support of many of the F+W staff there, too.

    I had an odd experience watching myself paint. I started to become more of an observer, naturally, and at one point I caught myself thinking that ‘she’ should have done something differently! Out of that I realized that when I paint I’m standing directly in front of the easel, but an observer is necessarily standing to one side or the other. As a teacher I need to remember that the student watching my demo is not seeing exactly what I see and consider further how I can answer the questions they have. Now in my classes I’m trying to remember to stop and allow my students to step directly in front of the easel for a moment so that they can see what I’m seeing as I paint. So you see, I’m also learning from the videos!

    I hope many people enjoy and benefit from them. I have a thread over at WetCanvas where people are welcome to ask questions they have about my process, so I hope people will join our discussions there!

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