How To Get Your Art Noticed | Art Business Advice

Being a creative entrepreneur can have bipolar effects–it takes a balancing effort worthy of the Wallendas to stay humble and yet simultaneously broadcast to the world that you’re talented and your art is worth buying. But I’m here to tell you that you must promote your work! Doing so is the best way to market yourself as an artist and ultimately sell your art. Call it boldness, call it audacity, call it what you want, but when it comes to art business, you cannot wait for someone to stumble across your work if it’s stacked up in your studio. No matter what your art is–sculpture, painting or photography–get it into the buyers’ hands.

In the 2016 Photographer’s Market, you’ll find articles on how to sell your art, keep your files organized, protect your copyright and much more. The following excerpt is on how to get your art noticed by using self-promotion mailers.

Art Business: Self-Promotion Mailers from the 2016 Photographer’s Market

There are basically three ways to acquaint photo buyers with your work: through the mail, over the Internet or in person. No one way is better or more effective than another. They each serve an individual function and should be used in concert to increase your visibility and, with a little luck, your sales.

When you are just starting to get your name out there and want to begin generating assignments and stock sales, it’s time to design a self-promotion campaign. This is your chance to do your best, most creative work and package it in an unforgettable way to get the attention of busy photo buyers. Self-promotions traditionally are sample images printed on card stock and sent through the mail to potential clients. If the image you choose is strong and you carefully target your mailing, a traditional self-promotion can work.

But don’t be afraid to go out on a limb here. You want to show just how amazing and creative you are, and you want the photo buyer to hang on to your sample for as long as possible. Why not make it impossible to throw away? Instead of a simple postcard, maybe you could send a small, usable notepad with one of your images at the top, or a calendar the photo buyer can hang up and use all year. If you target your mailing carefully, this kind of special promotion needn’t be expensive.

If you’re worried that a single image can’t do justice to your unique style, you have two options. One way to get multiple images in front of photo buyers without sending an overwhelming package is to design a campaign of promotions that builds from a single image to a small group of related photos. Make the images tell a story and indicate that there are more to follow. If you are computer savvy, the other way to showcase a sampling of your work is to point photo buyers to an online portfolio of your best work. Send a single sample that includes your Internet address, and ask buyers to take a look. ~2016 Photographer’s Market

North Light Shop has a new collection available that, although specifically for photographers, will be appreciated by anyone interested in art business or learning about professional photography: The Photographer’s “Create-and-Show” kit includes the 2016 Photographer’s Market, Art of Everyday Photography book and eCompanion by Susan Tuttle, and a “Create and Show” professional art board and Matboard kit from Crescent.

Use these resources to learn how to break into photography. Remember, don’t hold back when it comes to promoting yourself and your art. No one else is going to do it for you. 😉

Stay amazing and creative,
Cherie

Cherie Haas, online editor**Free download! Claim Your Art Business Tip Guide to Learn How to Sell Your Art **Click here to subscribe to the Artists Network newsletter for inspiration, instruction, and more!

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