The Reasons Your Art Business Could Fail

When it comes to visual arts, it’s a good idea to compare your understandings and practices with similar interests, especially when it comes to art business. You can model your own practices on the successes of those before and around you. That’s why, although we know you come to ArtistsNetwork mainly for drawing and painting techniques and inspiration, I want to share with you some art business advice from our Photographer’s Market  friends. Read this advice from editor Mary Bostic and contributor Vik Orenstein for info that can propel your own success when you want to sell your art.

“Love it or hate it, dealing with money is a key component to running a successful photography business,” Mary advises. “While your passion for shooting is why you became a photographer, competently handling your income and outgo allows you to keep doing what you love.

“If handling money isn’t your strength, we’re here to help. This edition of Photographer’s Market includes articles on pricing your work, selling without begging, obtaining micro funding for your business, and options for accepting payment from your clients.

“You’ll also find features on a variety of topics to help keep your business running smoothly and inspiring interviews with three successful photographers. And, as always, we’ve included more than 1,500 individually verified market contacts (complete with payment information!).”

The Reasons Most Small Businesses Fail by Vik Orenstein

I hate to bring up an ugly word like failure when you’re just getting started, but the fact is that roughly 80 percent of all new businesses fail. I’m not trying to be pessimistic or even cautionary, just pragmatic. I believe that if you’re aware in advance of the reasons others before you have failed, you’ll be able to avoid repeating them yourself.

A lack of knowledge. Failure can result when the new business owner hasn’t done his research. Not just research into his market as it exists in the present, but the history of the market and the names of all the major players. Knowing where your colleagues have been will help you steer yourself where you want to go.

A lack of passion. No matter that you try to have realistic expectations going into your new business venture; no matter that you’ve intentionally taken off those rose-colored glasses to face the glare of reality; no matter how well you try to prepare yourself, starting up your own studio is going to be harder than you think. Really. So unless you have that big fire in your belly, unless you love creating images so much that you wax rhapsodic just thinking about it, don’t bother. Because you will find the sacrifices too great and the rewards too few, and you’ll go sprinting back to that “real” job before you can say “Bruce Weber and Annie Leibovitz.”

That little four letter word: fear. Human beings are funny animals. We fear failure. We fear success. And in either case, that fear can make us abandon ship. ~Vik

Read Vic’s full article when you take advantage of the new, lower price of this Photographer’s Create-and-Show Kit. Order yours today for the 2016 Photographer’s Market, (which comes with access to ArtistsMarketOnline.com), Art of Everyday Photography, Art of Everyday Photography Companion eBook, and a Crescent Create And Show Kit for presenting art.

Photographer’s Market also includes up-to-date information on how to start and run a photography business, how to find clients, who to contact to submit your photos, what types of photos they need and how to submit both digital and film images, informative articles on taking stock photos, managing models, and the benefits of slowing down to create better work.

Wishing you all the best in your artistic endeavors,
Cherie

Cherie Haas, online editor
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