“My heart with pleasure fills, and dances with the daffodils” | A Donna Dewberry Art Lesson

Donna Dewberry is one of our most searched-for artists; her well-known “one-stroke painting” technique is easy to learn and provides satisfying results for those new to painting, especially. Her flowers are lovely, and you can learn how to paint them just as she does in her newest book, Essential Guide to Flower and Landscape Painting: 50 Decorative and One-Stroke Painting Techniques. But don’t just take it from me–try Donna’s step-by-step demonstration of how to paint a daffodil (below).

How to Paint a Daffodil by Donna Dewberry

First things first!

Brushes: ¾-inch (19mm) flat • No. 12 flat
Colors: Yellow Citron • Thicket • Yellow Light • Yellow Ochre • Wicker White • Burnt Umber
Other: floating medium


How to Paint a Daffodil Using One-Stroke Painting by Donna Dewberry

Daffodil 1a
1. Double-load a ¾-inch flat with Yellow Citron and Thicket. Dip the brush into floating medium to make it easier to paint over the crackled background. Paint a large leaf and pull a couple of stems upward from the base using the chisel edge of the brush.

Daffodil 02

2. Double-load a ¾-inch flat with Yellow Light and Yellow Ochre and paint the base of the daffodil blossom with a tight C-stroke.

Daffodil 03

3. With the same brush and colors, paint the open petals, picking up Wicker White as needed on the Yellow Light side of the brush. Keep the Yellow Ochre side to the outside of the petals. Start each petal at the base, push down on the bristles, slide up and lift to the tip, then slide back down to the base.

Daffodil 04

4. Double-load a ¾-inch flat with Yellow Light and Yellow Ochre and paint the trumpet, keeping the Yellow Ochre to the outside to separate the base of the trumpet from the outside petals.

Daffodil 05

5. Double-load a No. 12 flat with Yellow Light and Wicker White and paint a ruffly circle for the opening of the trumpet.

Daffodil 06

6. Load a No. 12 flat with floating medium and side-load into Burnt Umber. Float shade to the inside edges of the petals and the throat of the trumpet. The pod at the base is Thicket and Yellow Citron. To finish, deepen the shading on the petals and trumpet base with Yellow Ochre and floating medium on a No. 12 flat. Add the closed bud on the other stem with the same colors: Yellow Light, Yellow Ochre and Burnt Umber.

The directions for creating the “allover crackled” background shown in this demo are in the techniques section of the Essential Guide to Flower and Landscape Painting. Keep reading below for the William Wordsworth poem that I quoted in the subject line of today’s message. Lovely images and imagery, they are.

Happy painting,
Cherie

Daffodils
I wandered lonely as a cloud
That floats on high o’er vales and hills,
When all at once I saw a crowd,
A host, of golden daffodils;
Beside the lake, beneath the trees,
Fluttering and dancing in the breeze.

Continuous as the stars that shine
And twinkle on the milky way,
They stretched in never-ending line
Along the margin of a bay:
Ten thousand saw I at a glance,
Tossing their heads in sprightly dance.

The waves beside them danced; but they
Out-did the sparkling waves in glee:
A poet could not but be gay,
In such a jocund company:
I gazed–and gazed–but little thought
What wealth the show to me had brought:

For oft, when on my couch I lie
In vacant or in pensive mood,
They flash upon that inward eye
Which is the bliss of solitude;
And then my heart with pleasure fills,
And dances with the daffodils. ~ William Wordsworth


Donna Dewberry, One Stroke Painting Technique

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