Exhibition of the Month: Drawing Motion in North Carolina

Drawing motion and contributing a sense of live movement to a picture is one of the hardest challenges artists face. “In Motion,” an exhibition at the Weatherspoon Art Museum at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG), explores this subject from both artistic and scientific angles, making it Drawing magazine’s exhibition of the month for January.

The exhibition studies the boundary between art and the field of kinesiology. Also referred to as human kinetics, kinesiology is the study of human movement, incorporating biomechanics, anatomy, physiology, psychology and neuroscience. “In Motion” is inspired by a collaboration between the educational staff at the Weatershpoon and faculty in the Department of Kinesiology at UNCG.

Drawing Motion - Abraham Walkowitz - Artist's Network

Isadora Duncan, by Abraham Walkowitz, ca. 1920, watercolor and graphite, 12 1/2 x 8. All artwork this exhibition courtesy Weatherspoon Art Museum, Greensboro, North Carolina.

The exhibition features artwork depicting a variety of implied movement–physical, psychological or optical. The works by artists such as Peter Agostini (1913–1993), John Steuart Curry (1897–1946) and Abraham Walkowitz (1878–1965) range from agitated to humorous and span a variety of media including graphite, printmaking, watercolor and mixed media.

Drawing Motion  - Peter Agostini - Artist's Network

Horse and Lion, by Peter Agostini, 1942, graphite, 16 3/4 x 13 7/8.

The motions depicted range from mundane everyday routines to dramatic physical feats and violent confrontations, and each image invites the viewer to conceive the complete course of the motion, imagining what has happened just before the moment depicted and what will happen after.

Drawing Motion - John Steuart Curry - Artist's Network

The Missed Leap, by John Steuart Curry, ca. 1934, lithograph, 21 1/2 x 13 5/8.

If you’re in or around the Greensboro area, we hope you can make the exhibition. If not, stay tuned by subscribing to Drawing to learn about interesting exhibits in your area.

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