Chromacolour Paints Put to the Test


Chromacolour on Location: i??While hiking, I came across a beaver pond that I knew I wanted to go back to. When I made the return trip, I found that the pond had been washed away. There was still enough water to show the reflection of the trees, however. My initial wash was a warm red-violet; you can see traces of it on the edges of the pines,i?? says Stephen Quiller of Edge of the Pond (Chroma- colour on Claybord, 20 x 12).

an artist tests:

If you’ve ever toured an exhibit of cells from animated Disney classics like Snow White or Peter Pan, youi??ve seen Chromacolour up close. After supplying paints to the film industry for many years Chromacolour International recently developed a line of artists’ colors. Water-based, Chromacolour has properties akin to those of watercolor, acrylic and gouache. According to the company’s promotional material, “Chromacolour is so powerful it can be diluted seven times more than traditional watercolors, yet can also be applied in thick opaque layers like gouache.” Chromacolour comes in bottles and tubes. In contrast to watercolor which dries light, Chromacolour dries to almost exactly the same color as it is when wet. We asked Stephen Quiller, a master in acrylics, watercolor, casein and gouache, to give Chromacolour a try. He took it on the road and worked with it in his studio, as well.


Chromacolour Transparent and Opaque: “First I toned the paper with a wash of transparent gray. Then I built the pattern of trees. With white (actually white that Ii??d worked a little yellow and yellow orange into) I brushed in the waterfall so it would pop. I also used varied white splotches in and around the trees,” says Stephen Quiller of Waterfall, Phoenix Park (Chromacolour on Claybord, 16 x 12).

the results:

“Chromacolour is a good paint; I enjoyed it a lot,” says Stephen Quiller. “I imagine that people working in a lot of different directions could use it. Chroma – Colour dries in the same amount of time that watercolor does. It won’t lift, once it dries; in that way it’s like acrylics. It will give you a luminous color, but it dries to a matte finish. Most acrylics have a sheen, so Chromacolour is more like gouache in its finished look. Artists who don’t like the sheen of acrylics could like these paints.”

Working with flat synthetic brushes made by Jack Richeson (Series 7000 Quiller), Quiller tried Chromacolour on Claybord and watercolor board. “Chromacolour has a good deal of opacity. You can work dark to light; you can cover a dark area with a light. In one painting I did with Chromacolour, I worked bright orange over a dark area in one application. Most acrylics would require that I build up the color. Ii??d recommend Chromacolour because it’s so versatile as a medium. Collage might be an interesting thing to try with Chromacolour, and the paints would be good for an artist who’s working abstractly.”


Chromacolour in the Studio:i??For Pond on Medicine Bow (ChromaColour on board, 15 x 11), I used traditional watercolor technique: thin washes to start, some wet-into-wet passages, and other areas where I built up areas of more opaque color,i?? says Stephen Quiller.

product information:

For more information and a full-color art materials catalogue, call Chromacolour International at 888/247-6621. Web site: www.chromacolour.com.

Mark Gottsegen is an associate professor of art at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro and chair of the ASTM International?s subcommittee on artists? materials

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